Your Hair and Your Thyroid

How Your Thyroid Affects Your Hair Beauty?




Hair beauty is inevitable for almost every male and female around the world. A million-dollar cosmetic industry is working due to the prioritization of physical appearance and beauty.

Hair beauty is one of the chief factors which contribute to the overall look of a person. That is why people have more concerns about their hair, skin, and body.

In some cases, as in medical disturbances, these features can have a direct effect. How Your Thyroid Affects Your Hair Beauty?



Hair beauty is inevitable for almost every male and female around the world. A million-dollar cosmetic industry is working due to the prioritization of physical appearance and beauty.


Hair beauty is one of the chief factors which contribute to the overall look of a person. That is why people have more concerns about their hair, skin, and body.


In some cases, as in medical disturbances, these features can have a direct effect.

In this condition, the thyroid gland tends to stay overactive than normal functioning. It can also exhibit characteristics as anxiety and nervousness in an individual.



While in hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland works slower than the normal functioning. In this case, individuals may show slow symptoms, ranging from general body fatigue to weight gain.


The connection between hair health and thyroid problems:

Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are dysfunctions of the thyroid gland. If you leave thyroid dysfunctions untreated, they can result in severe intensity hair loss.

To understand this phenomenon, you must know about the life cycle of hair growth.

Growth of hair starts from the scalp or bottom of the hair inside the hair follicle. This hair root gets its nutrition from the blood vessels, which are supplying blood to the scalp.

With blood supply, the hair strand tends to grow out and passes through scalp glands, producing sebum and oils to keep them protected and moist. Over time, the fully-grown hair tends to shed off the scalp to make room for new hair strands. In this way, the whole process of hair growth continues.

There is a disturbance in T3 and T4 hormone production during thyroid disorders, affecting other body processes. This problem starts from the fundamental step at the root hair. In such a condition, hair does not replace the newly grown hair, leaving the scalp's area empty. It results in hair thinning, hair loss, and even thinning of eyelashes and eyebrows.





• The most common hair disease associated with thyroid problems is Alopecia. It is an autoimmune disorder that results in patches of hair thinning or hair loss. Over time, Alopecia can induce baldness.

• Some medications to treat thyroid diseases as propylthiouracil and carbimazole, can also induce hair thinning by affecting the hair cycle.

Symptoms of thyroid-related hair thinning or hair loss:

There are a few characteristic features of thyroid-associated hair loss as:

• Changing in the texture of the hair. In the case of hypothyroidism, hair can become extra brittle or dry

• In hyperthyroidism, hair can become thin, soft, and smooth.

• Diffused thinning or loss of hair from the scalp

• A more discrete hair loss leaving circular patches of baldness all over the scalp

• Other features may include hair loss from other body parts as the face, eyebrows, and eyelashes.

• Loss of hair from the outer edges of the eyebrows can be a distinguishing factor for thyroid diseases.

Although thyroid diseases harm the beauty of the hair, yet they are curable. A timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment can reverse your hair damage and beauty.









References:

1. Shapiro J. Hair loss in women. New England Journal of Medicine. 2007 Oct 18;357(16):1620-30.

2. Freinkel RK, Freinkel N. Hair growth and alopecia in hypothyroidism. Archives of dermatology. 1972 Sep 1;106(3):349-52.

3. Jordan DR, Ahuja N, Khouri L. Eyelash loss associated with hyperthyroidism. Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery. 2002 May 1;18(3):219-22.

4. Freinkel RK, Freinkel N. Hair growth and alopecia in hypothyroidism. Archives of dermatology. 1972 Sep 1;106(3):349-52.







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